Blessed Friday: Sultan Qaboos Grand Mosque

Sultam Qaboos Mosque Oman

I try to seize every possible chance to visit beautiful mosques around the world. Any opportunity to visually feast on something so sentimentally valuable to me is greatly welcomed. I like to marvel at their magnificence while getting spiritually recharged. It is the perfect two in one deal.

After visiting Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque in Abu Dhabi, I was entirely convinced that no other will impress me as much, but when I wandered around the Sultan Qaboos Grand Mosque in the Omani capital absolutely dazed in fascination, I knew that’s sheer beauty I was looking at.

Not to compare the two mosques, obviously each has its own distinct style and enough attention-grabbing details to set them apart. Both took my feeble little heart captive.

In 2001 His Majesty Sultan Qaboos bin Saeed Al Saeed gifted his nation this architectural spectacle to serve as a place of worship, and a forum for sharing Islamic culture and values. He led the opening prayer himself, in the hall that takes up to 6000 worshippers. The total capacity of the mosque is 20000 people, including the women’s prayer hall, large enough for 750.

“Don’t leave Muscat without seeing it” , was the advice handed over to me by a number of friends who have been there before. Only at the time of our visit did I realize why they sounded so impressed! I am glad they left the details out for me to personally witness though, and there were plenty of striking details to admire.

Click on photo to read the caption

I can’t help but imagine the festive air that fills the place when packed in special occasions like Ramadan or Eid prayers. It must be such a sight to behold…

Have you visited the Sultan Qaboos Grand Mosque in Muscat? What did you think?

5 thoughts on “Blessed Friday: Sultan Qaboos Grand Mosque

    1. The last time I visited Egypt it was 2003. I was there for a very quick visit and didn’t mange to see much really! I can’t wait for the next time. I want to see everything there is to be seen in Egypt.

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